Have Microsoft? Don’t want Windows 10? Get over it

Have Microsoft? Don’t want Windows 10? Get over it

Microsoft has announced that they will try and get their Windows 7 and 8 users to upgrade to Windows 10 with a “recommended update” starting in 2016.  

 

While this update will be helpful to those that want Windows 10, it could force the upgrade on some of those that like using earlier versions of the software. If the user has their automatic updates activated, which most do since it’s the default setting, the software will begin the upgrade to Windows 10 without asking. How can this large automatic update cause problems for those that have yet to make the switch to Windows 10?

 

Windows 10 has been free to Windows 7 and 8 users since July, but there are several reasons beyond preference to stick with the older versions. Many have yet to upgrade because they have a metered connection, so their internet service provider charges by the amount of data they use. Upgrading could use up around six gigabytes of a user’s data allowance for the month, so this could be costly to those that don’t know what they’re downloading. Terry Myerson, the executive vice president of Microsoft’s Windows and Devices group, says that the solution to this problem is to just turn off the automatic updates.           

 

Terry Myerson, the executive vice president of Microsoft’s Windows and Devices group

Terry Myerson, the executive vice president of Microsoft’s Windows and Devices group, says that the solution to this problem is to just turn off the automatic updates. (Geek Wire)

“If you are on a metered connection on Windows 7 or Windows 8.1, then you have the option of turning off automatic updates. We strongly discourage this in today’s connected world because of the constant risk of internet threats,” said Myerson.  

 

This solution neglects those that don’t hear news of this future update. To make sure users of past Windows versions know of the update before it downloads, Microsoft may want to have a few pop-up alerts that inform them that there is a big update incoming. When the upgrade is ready to download, Microsoft should also make sure to warn all of the users with the specifics of the update, such as file size, changes being made, and estimated download time.      

 

Those that receive the update next year will have a chance to “roll back” to their previous version of Windows after 31 days if they choose, according to Myerson. As long as Microsoft makes it clear to customers that they can switch back in this time frame, with instructions on how to do so, this forced update may not be a full-on PR disaster.   

 

Will you upgrade to Windows 10? Is there a problem with Microsoft’s decision to add Windows 10 to the 2016 update? Leave a comment or talk to me on Twitter @Karbowski_Devon.

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