AdultFriendFinder security breach compromises user information

AdultFriendFinder security breach compromises user information

Privacy seems to be more of a luxury than a value, especially with recent cyber attacks on major companies such as Sony. This illustrates that the cyberspace has become an arena for breaches of secrets and confidentiality.

 

The popular “no-strings attached” adult hook-up website AdultFriendFinder.com recently suffered a major cyber attack, causing the dissemination of extremely personal information about site users. The attacker even hacked deleted accounts.

 

The user information released included: full names, sexual preferences, and nude pictures. Credit card information was also taken from the site but removed before posting, highlighting the severity of financial threats from cyber attacks. Calling himself ROR[RG], the hacker allegedly leaked the information to online message boards because the site owed money to his friend.

 

Screen shot of AdultFriendFinder home page.

Investigations are pending regarding the severity of the security breach and the search of the main hacker. (i2.cdn.turner.com)

ROR[RG] has since taunted the authorities, seemingly very proud of his actions. In a follow up message, he described AdultFriendFinder as a “pervo site,” and explicitly claimed to be located in Thailand. Whether or not that information is a red herring remains to be seen.

 

AdultFriendFinder needs to work quickly to repair its damaged reputation in the wake of these attacks. First, and most obviously, they have to figure out what happened. The company issued a statement, claiming to have begun to conduct a “comprehensive investigation with the help of leading third-party forensic experts.”

 

The company must move beyond investigating the issue and also regain the trust of their users. One of the most efficient ways to save face in this scenario comes from issuing a swift and sincere apology to users for their inconvenience and emotional distress caused by the matter.

 

What do you think of this security breach? Do we assume these risks every time we go online? What should be done about these hacks? Comment below or tweet @connerws.

Conner Schwerdtfeger

A recent graduate from Chapman University, Conner aspires to tell stories that not only engage, but inform and inspire readers around the world. Growing up in the highly active culture of San Diego, he has a passion for adventure and is always looking for new and interesting experiences. Fun is the name of the game, and he holds firm to the idea that a day without laughter is a day wasted. He has a passion for fitness, and when not at his desk can most likely be found hiking or swimming. He reports on a wide variety of topics for MUIPR, with an emphasis on entertainment and current events. Follow on Twitter @connerws.

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