Fashion Spotlight: Who is Andrej Pejic?

Fashion Spotlight: Who is Andrej Pejic?

Andrej Pejic is an androgynous model who has walked the most famous runways in the world and modeled for designers like Marc Jacobs and Jean-Paul Gaultier.

 

Andrej Pejic (www.harpersbazaar.es)

Andrej Pejic (www.harpersbazaar.es)

Pejic, who prefers female pronouns, was discovered in 2011, and has modeled both men’s and women’s clothing ever since. However, Pejic’s success was not always so. Living in Australia, the model was told there was no room in the male modeling industry for someone who looked so feminine.

 

Pejic then moved to London to try to find work and was met with a few odd jobs until finally reaching a breakthrough when the editor-in-chief of “French Vogue” suggested the model dress as a woman.

 

 

Pejic has crossed gender boundaries in a way that is rarely seen in the fashion world. Her work begs the question, “what does gender mean?”

 

In an interview with New York Magazine, Pejic says, “It’s not like, ‘Okay, today I want to look like a man, or today I want to look like a woman.’ I want to look like me. It just so happens that some of the things I like are feminine.” The model continues by saying, “I guess professionally I’ve left my gender open to artistic interpretation.”

 

Andrej Pejic (www.inspirefirst.com)

Andrej Pejic (www.inspirefirst.com)

In modern society, gender has become such a binary social construct, and one that is often difficult to break, or even redefine. Androgyny in fashion may be a good first step in changing social norms around the definitive boundaries we have place on gender. Some wonder if androgyny in fashion may help future generations of children express themselves. Though women and men both wear jeans and pants and t-shirts, we live in a world where it is very clear what are “girl clothes” and what are “boy clothes.” More and more, lately, these distinct boxes have begun to fade,  making it a little easier to dabble into the other side. By creating a more androgynous fashion world, we may be able to give children a more organic way of expressing themselves, instead of being forced into making absolute statements about themselves with each clothing choice they make.

 

What do you think about androgynous fashion? Let us know in the comments below or tweet me @LydiaYekalam

Lydia Yekalam

Lydia Yekalam is a Freelance Writer for MUIPR. She was born and raised in Seattle, and is currently a communications major at the University of Washington. Lydia loves traveling and hopes to one day live in Europe. Her hobbies include taking Instagram-worthy photos, creating DIY interior design projects, and pursuing all things fitness related. Follow Lydia on Twitter @LydiaYekalam

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